Biology & Life Sciences
Learn about the human body, plant life, and the animal world. Come see the resources and ideas we've collected to make learning about biology interesting, easy, and fun. From preschool-aged to high school level, you'll find everything you need here.
Things to See & Do in Wyoming
Fossil Butte National Monument
Located near Kemmerer, Fossil Butte National Monument is a 50-million year old lake bed and one of the richest fossil localities in the world. Recorded in limestone are dynamic and complete paleoecosystems that spanned two million years. Preservation is so complete that it allows for detailed study of climate change and its effects on biological communities. Visitors discover that this resource displays the interrelationships of plants, insects, fishes, reptiles and mammals, like few other known fossil sites. The relevance and challenge of study and preservation of this ancient ecosystem are equal to those of a modern ecosystem. The surface topography of Fossil Butte is now covered by a high cold desert. Sagebrush is the dominant vegetation at the lower elevations, while limber pine and aspen occur on the slopes. Pronghorn, Mule deer and a variety of birds are commonly seen. Moose, elk and beaver are sometimes observed.
Hot Springs State Park
Located in Thermopolis, at Hot Springs State Park you'll enjoy soothing waters, views of the unforgettable bison, and some of the loveliest flower gardens in the state.
Glendo State Park
Glendo State Park is best known for its excellent boating opportunities. There are areas for water skiing and fishing. Plus, you're right in the middle of a very historic area. The knowledgeable staff will help you get the most out of your visit.
Devils Tower National Monument
The nearly vertical monolith known as Devils Tower rises 1,267 feet above the meandering Belle Fourche River. Once hidden below the earth's surface, erosion has stripped away the softer rock layers revealing Devils Tower. Known by several northern plains tribes as Bears Lodge, it is a sacred site of worship for many American Indians. The rolling hills of this 1,347 acre park are covered with pine forests, deciduous woodlands, and prairie grasslands. Deer, prairie dogs, and other wildlife are abundant. Proclaimed September 24, 1906 as the nation's first national monument by President Theodore Roosevelt.
Grand Teton National Park
Located in northwestern Wyoming, Grand Teton National Park protects stunning mountain scenery and a diverse array of wildlife. The central feature of the park is the Teton Range — an active, fault-block, 40-mile-long mountain front. The range includes eight peaks over 12,000 feet (3,658 m), including the Grand Teton at 13,770 feet (4,198 m). Seven morainal lakes run along the base of the range, and more than 100 alpine lakes can be found in the backcountry. Elk, moose, pronghorn, mule deer, and bison are commonly seen in the park. Black bears are common in forested areas, while grizzlies are occasionally observed in the northern part of the park. More than 300 species of birds can be observed, including bald eagles and peregrine falcons.
Seminoe State Park
Seminoe State Park offers good fishing and excellent boating opportunities. Wildlife viewing is plentiful for the patient observer. Located in Sinclair, Wyoming
Edness Kimball Wilkins State Park
At Edness Kimball Wilkins State Park in Evansville, birdwatching, walking, fishing are only a few of the numerous ways you can enjoy your stay.
Yellowstone National Park
About 640,000 years ago a massive volcanic eruption spewed an immense volume of ash that covered all of the western U.S., much of the Midwest, northern Mexico and some areas of the eastern Pacific. This was one of many processes that shaped Yellowstone National Park--a region once rumored to be "the place where hell bubbles up." Geothermal wonders, such as Old Faithful, are evidence of one of the world's largest active volcanoes. These spectacular features bemused and befuddled the park's earliest visitors, and helped lead to the creation of the world's first national park.
Guernsey State Park
At Guernsey State Park, don't miss seeing the unique Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) building, including the park museum. Walk the enjoyable volksmarch and enjoy wonderful water recreation.
Sinks Canyon State Park
This unique park offers you hiking trails, abundant wildlife viewing, birdwatching, fishing and a puzzling geologic phenomenon...the sinks and the rise. Located in Lander, Wyoming.
Keyhole State Park
Keyhole State Park, in Moorcroft, has activities for everyone to enjoy--swimming, sunbathing, hiking the volksmarch trail, boating, water-skiing, birdwatching, and fishing. Some of Wyoming's largest fish have been caught at Keyhole!
Wyoming Dinosaur Center
Located in Thermopolis, the Wyoming Dinosaur Center features interpretive displays, dioramas, and life-size dinosaur mounts. It has 12,000 square feet of exhibition area. Fossils and life-forms from earliest geologic time periods are displayed in a time-perspective. There are over 200 displays throughout the museum. The central hall houses 20 full-size mounted skeletons, including 10 dinosaurs. There are also over 60 identified active digsites in a 500-acre area. They also offer Kids' Digs.
Curt Gowdy State Park
Curt Gowdy State Park has some excellent fishing, hiking, wildlife watching and wild flowers. Located in Cheyenne.
Boysen State Park
Boysen State Park is located near Shoshoni, Wyoming. Don't miss the information signage on Highway 20 at the overlook to the dam, at the entrance to the tunnel, and also at the north end of the Lower Wind River Campground. Intriguing geological information signage is throughout the Wind River Canyon on U.S. 26 and at lakeside. Whether it's fishing, boating, or just relaxing, Boysen is a great place to visit.
Buffalo Bill State Park
Buffalo Bill State Park offers opportunities for camping, picnicking, boating, and fishing. Located in Cody, Wyoming.
Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area
Bighorn Lake extends approximately 60 miles through Wyoming and Montana, 55 miles of which are held within spectacular Bighorn Canyon. The Recreation Area is composed of 70,000+ acres, which straddles the northern Wyoming and southern Montana borders. There are two visitor centers and other developed facilities in Fort Smith, Montana and near Lovell, Wyoming. The Afterbay Lake below the Yellowtail Dam is a good spot for trout fishing and wildlife viewing for ducks, geese and other animals. The Bighorn River below the Afterbay Dam is a world class trout fishing area. Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area is a lesser known treasure waiting to be discovered. It boasts breath-taking scenery, countless varieties of wildlife, and abundant recreational opportunities, such as boating, fishing, ice fishing, camping, and hiking. Bighorn Canyon offers visitors what few other National Park areas can, that of solitude, serenity, and beauty.
John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway
Located at the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, the Rockefeller Parkway connects Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks. The late conservationist and philanthropist John D. Rockefeller, Jr. made significant contributions to several national parks including Grand Teton, Acadia, Great Smoky Mountains, and Virgin Islands. In 1972 Congress dedicated a 24,000 acre parcel of land as John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway to recognize his generosity and foresight. The parkway provides a natural link between the two national parks and contains features characteristic of both areas. In the parkway, the Teton Range tapers to a gentle slope at its northern edge, while rocks born of volcanic flows from Yellowstone line the Snake River and form outcroppings scattered atop hills and ridges.
Bear River State Park
Bear River State Park is located in the southwest corner of the state, near Evanston. Abundant wildlife including their own "herd" of bison afford rare viewing opportunities and give the visitor a taste of wild Wyoming. Hiking, skiing trails, picnic shelters and a lazy river all combine to make Bear River State Park a unique Wyoming experience.
Hawk Springs State Recreation Area
Hawk Springs State Recreation Area has activities for everyone to enjoy—boating, waterskiing, fishing, birdwatching and just relaxing. Located in Goshen County, Wyoming.
Activities & Experiments
Arbor Day National Poster Contest
Join over 74,000 fifth grade classrooms and home schools across America in the Arbor Day National Poster Contest. The theme chosen will increase your students’ knowledge of how trees produce and conserve energy. The free Activity Guide includes activities to use with fifth grade students to teach the importance of trees in producing and conserving energy. These activities correlate with National Science and Social Study Standards. The Guide also includes all of the information you need for poster contest participation.
Handbook of Nature Study
Based on Charlotte Mason's method of education, this website offers ideas and resources for incorporation nature study into your homeschool.
Considering God's Creation
Life science truly comes alive with this 270-page lap-book style notebook for 2nd-7th graders. A Charlotte Mason type discovery approach is easily implemented with creative activities, music and topical Bible studies, making this program a perfect choice for a homeschool family or a classroom. It may be used as a stand-alone science course or as an invaluable supplemental resource for any other program. 
How I Teach a Large Family in a Relaxed, Classical Way: Science
Family style learning is a great way to tackle lots of different subjects, including science.
ExploraVision
ExploraVision is a competition for all students in grades K-12 attending a school in the U.S., Canada, U.S. Territory or a Department of Defense school. Homeschooled students are eligible to enter. It is designed to encourage students to combine their imagination with their knowledge of science and technology to explore visions of the future. Teams of students select a technology, research how it works and why it was invented, and then project how that technology may change in the future. They must then identify what breakthroughs are required for their vision to become a reality and describe the positive and negative consequences of their technology on society. Winning ideas have focused on things as simple as ballpoint pens and as complex as satellite communications. The student teams write a paper and draw a series of Web page graphics to describe their idea. Regional winners make a Web site and a prototype of their future vision.
Looking for Another State?
Featured Resources

As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases. We get commissions for purchases made through links on this site.

The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home
This book will instruct you, step by step, on how to give your child an academically rigorous, comprehensive education from preschool through high school. Two veteran home educators outline the classical pattern of education—the trivium—which organizes learning around the maturing capacity of the child's mind: the elementary school "grammar stage," the middle school "logic stage," and the high school "rhetoric stage." Using the trivium as your model, you'll be able to instruct your child in all ...
Kingdom of Children : Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology)
More than one million American children are schooled by their parents. As their ranks grow, home schoolers are making headlines by winning national spelling bees and excelling at elite universities. The few studies conducted suggest that homeschooled children are academically successful and remarkably well socialized. Yet we still know little about this alternative to one of society's most fundamental institutions. Beyond a vague notion of children reading around the kitchen table, we don't know...
I Learn Better by Teaching Myself/Still Teaching Ourselves
Take a look at how a homeschooling mother learned to trust her children-and herself-to learn in new ways. Tag along on the journey from the elementary years through high school as this book explore the success and freedom of unstructured learning. These books are especially good for anyone wrestling with the question of "how much structure should there be in a homeschool?"
Maria Montessori: Her Life and Work
Maria Montessori is important background reading for parents considering Montessori education for their children, as well as for those training to become Montessori teachers. The first woman to win a degree as a Doctor of Medicine in Italy in 1896, Maria Montessori's mission to improve children's education began in the slums of Rome in 1907, and continued throughout her lifetime. Her insights into the minds of children led her to develop prepared environments and other tools and devices that ha...
One Thing at a Time : 100 Simple Ways to Live Clutter-Free Every Day
Simple, effective ways to put things in their placeThose piles of papers, clothes, and other things you thought you'd successfully de-cluttered have returned, and this time they brought friends. What's the use of trying to fight the clutter? Is there a better way?This powerful and useful guide delivers solutions that work, no matter how overwhelmed you feel. The answer isn't an elaborate new system, or a solemn vow to start tomorrow. Instead, psychotherapist and organizer Cindy Glovinsky shares ...